Friday, October 23, 2015

Forced to Use Facebook for Work but Don't Want to


Some of my readers have written me in the past and told me that they want to give up Facebook, but due to their job or position, they are required to be on Facebook. At one point, such a thing would have sounded absurd, but I have come to realize that this is the reality for many people in the world. Many jobs require people to be on networks with other people and Facebook is the easiest way to do this. However, many say that because they arerequired to be on Facebook, they end up spending too much time on it. Some even tell me that they would rather not be on it and would not be if they had the choice. So, the question then becomes, how can one minimize their time on Facebook when they are required to have a presence on the site?

There are some ways in which you can minimize your time on Facebook.  If you have been following this site, you have read how I have been stating for a long time that Facebook is often a huge waste of time.  You have read how I stated that Facebook is very depressing, and how Facebook makes us compare our lives with others.  Oftentimes we boast about our lives on Facebook or feel the need (or want) to share everything.  Other times we are bombarded with negative information like politics and it becomes draining. It is  no wonder that many people do not want to be on Facebook at all.  

First, if you do not want to be on Facebook and you really have no choice, you have to be committed to curbing your use of the site.  It is hard.  I know all too well about the pull of Facebook.  Humans enjoy comparing themselves to other people.  It is through comparison that we find out how we measure up and where we stand.  However, much comparison does us no good in the end.  I propose that you set a goal of only using Facebook for business.  What does that mean?  It means not using Facebook at all for personal communication.  This means not being friends with people you went to high school or college with.  It means not friending family members.  It means only using it for business.  Make your profile private.   This may sound extreme, but if you are truly on Facebook for business, you have to make that point known to others.  Tell them that you would not be on Facebook but for being required to by your place of employment or the business that you own.  Tell family members that you want them to contact you by phone, e-mail, or via other more personal types of communication.  If they do not like it, send them here.  Be honest.  There is no reason for you to be ashamed for not wanting to be on Facebook.  In fact, more people should feel good about taking control of how they spend their time.  In the end, you will show others that your time not spent on Facebook has allowed you to do other things in life.  Things that are better for you, your family, and your job - the same on that requires you to be on Facebook.

Next you have to put a limit on the time you spend on Facebook.  Just because you erased your family and friends from Facebook does not mean that you will not spend time comparing yourself to your employees, employers or coworkers.  One way in which you can minimize the time spent on Facebook is to only follow those people who are absolutely essential for your job.  The less people you follow, the less will be on your wall.  With less on your wall, the less time you will feel compelled to use Facebook.  

Remember, limit the amount of time you spend on Facebook.  Only check it for work.  If you do not need to check it, don't.  Constantly remind people that e-mail is the best way for people to contact you.  You can have it so Facebook e-mails you if you get a message on the site.  Only check it when you get a message.  Tell people that you respond quickest to inquiries or to messages if they are sent via e-mail instead of Facebook.  Show the people who follow you on Facebook that you do not use it much.  If people see that you are rarely on, they are likely to do business with you via e-mail or by phone instead of using Facebook.

It is tricky to "have" to use Facebook for work or business, but remember, the amount of time you spend on the site is really up to you.  Set boundaries and follow them.  Even if you are forced to do something that you really do not want to do, you have the right to set boundaries in life.  I hope this helps.  Stay strong!

So, to recap:
  1.  Set a goal to spend less time on Facebook.
  2. Make Facebook less personal: do not friend family members and friends.  Tell them that you will contact them using more personal means, such as phone and email, or in person
  3. Make your profile private.
  4. Limit time spent on Facebook: 10-15 minutes a day should be sufficient.  Do not check it on days that are not necessary.  Treat it like e-mail.  Check it for important posts and leave quickly.  
  5. Follow only the people who are essential.  Do not follow anyone else.  
  6. Do not feel compelled to share private information or post pictures of your life.  You are not there to impress others.  You are there for work.  A profile picture or two is sufficient.  
  7. Keep telling people that e-mail works best for communication.  Tell people that you respond quicker if they contact you via e-mail or phone.
Serious about giving up Facebook?  Check out our new checklist of Facebook achievements and goals for making giving up Facebook and (a)social media easier for you to achieve.

3 comments:

  1. The editor no nothing sometimes people still think Facebook can get so many knowledge and know any news from their relatives:for example we know our relatives having babies through Facebook etc.

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  2. I think it is BS to make people do this. It is bad enough that companies require you to now log in to look at your check stubs, it is another to try and force someone to have something they don't want for their job. I can understand "going green", but it should not be required to have facebook for work related information.

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  3. I hate the fact that Facebook is force fed to many people who'd prefer to not have the wretched 'social networking' rearing to tell the world where and when someone goes to take a bath. I too am forced to use it for work, if I don't I'm letting my company down and being 'anti-social'. Let's face it the 'privacy' in private lives are void and null.

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